Crunch Time

While this article is about the games industry, the parallels with the VFX industry are unquestionable. Every worker should read this:

Studios push their employees harder to finish projects faster. Less time spent on development means less time employing a full team of artists, programmers, designers, testers etc.

“I’ve heard from my clients that the competition for [game development] jobs is fierce,” said Dr. Bennett. “My clients’ husbands and boyfriends feel totally replaceable, and therefore are worried that if they don’t perform, they’ll lose their jobs. There is definitely a culture of fear that’s cultivated in this industry.”

This “culture of fear” isn’t something overt, but rather is a subversive, almost jock-like attitude found throughout the industry.

as far back as 1909 studies have shown that the 40-hour work week actually provides more output over a long period of time than when employees work longer hours.

The only demonstrable effect of which might be a lowered quality of life for employees, and ultimately a shorter career for some of the greatest designers in the world.

Read the article here:

http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2011/05/the-death-march-the-problem-of-crunch-time-in-game-development.ars?&utm_source=google%20gmail&utm_medium=social-media&utm_campaign=addtoany

5 Responses to Crunch Time

  1. ParadiseRanch says:

    To be fair working conditions in both VFX and games are now converging in the same painful place, we definitely need to get back to a sustainable position where VFX is a job (not a lifestyle) and those doing it can enjoy a balanced life.

  2. Soldier: This is not a new problem in the games industry at all. For a very good study on this exact problem, take a look at the 2004 IGDA whitepaper on Quality Of Life: http://www.igda.org/quality-life-white-paper-info

  3. Christian says:

    The commercial industry is the same.

  4. Kevin Bjorke says:

    People should read Ed Yourdon’s “Death March”

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