Lumiere/Meteor VFX Bankrupt Again?!

I’ve seriously lost count of the number of times this has happened but VFX Artist Dave Rand comments:

Now just two years later my same friends are being ripped off again. The confidential sum of 1 dollar is hiding the fact that most are owed 15-35 thousand dollars. This time the project left for even cheaper outsourcing and the owners bankrupted the facility after promising that bounced and missed paychecks would never happen again if they all came back to work.

http://origin-pwc.pwc.com/en_CA/CA/car/lumiere/assets/lumiere-001_053011.pdf

While there hasn’t been any official announcement, the bankruptcy filing was from late May and according to Dave Rand, artists at Lumiere Studios, the company formerly known as Meteor which famously failed to pay VFX artists for their work on Journey To The Center Of The Earth, has yet again left VFX artists unpaid!

Of course what’s even more demoralizing is the predictable jock-like response from fellow VFX artists:

If you don’t like it then leave. I don’t work if I don’t get paid.

I agree with the idea but it’s a complete disregard of the reality of the situation:

The Montreal VFX industry is quite small and according to one worker, walking out in such a situation would only get you blacklisted.

It’s not like there’s another opportunity across town. The only other VFX job for you is probably all the way in New Zealand or the UK.

The dynamic is much different in LA, yes there are notorious employers who are known not to pay but usually an artist can reasonably avoid them by working for a better company across the street or another part of town.

Ironically, just a week ago the VES was in Montreal to discuss the state of the industry.

This latest event is just another example of why a collective bargaining agreement is needed in the VFX industry.

How do you prevent this problem without one? The studios want to do work in Montreal to collect the government subsidy money. Montreal is your home and you don’t want to move to the UK or NZ. This is the only gig in town and if you don’t play ball, you may find yourself blacklisted, not by the company, but by artists who chose to work through it and end up being bitter at you at the next facility they work at.

Having a union makes the organization a convenient “bad guy”.

“Hey guys I really wish I could work but the greedy union prevents me from working for free.”

You’d think I’m joking but there are actually people who I know that have expressed anger to me about The Animation Guild because they prevented them from working for free. According to the artist, he/she felt that had they been able to work for free, they would have been able to get that much wanted promotion from a certain Producer. It’s an insane line of reasoning to me. I’m all for competition, but not a race to the bottom.

Soldier On.

UPDATE: Dave Rand tweets the following info:

According to Mark Adley at Price Waterhouse, the artists will be lucky to get a fraction of the money owed them.

47 Responses to Lumiere/Meteor VFX Bankrupt Again?!

  1. Dave Rand says:

    Not only has this happened in the same location but as many recall the project that Meteor was on right up the bankruptcy was Journey to the Center of the Earth.
    Ironically the project that Lumiere was on right up to the bankruptcy is called

    “Journey to the Center of the Earth’s Core”

  2. Dave Rand says:

    I spoke with Mark Adley at Price Waterhouse in an effort to have the addresses of the artists blacked out from this public document, however, he stated that by law it has to be there.

  3. […] wrote this story two years ago for Motionographer. Seems someone will have to write it up again. VFXSoldier has some details here. Dave Rand notes: “Ironically the project that Lumiere was working on […]

  4. Dave S says:

    “of course what’s even more demoralizing is the predictable jock-like response from fellow VFX artists:

    If you don’t like it then leave. I don’t work if I don’t get paid.”

    I hate to say this is my sentiment, but if you’re not willing to walk away and leave you have no power. if you have no power this will happen again. Blacklisted? Only people who get blacklisted are jerk/people who’s attitude is the problem.
    Who’s going to say, you’re dead to me when someone has to leave due to not getting paid? You don’t leave in a mean way you say “I have to pay my bills and if I can’t get a pay check by this Friday I can’t come in on Monday I hope you can help resolve this for me.”
    Who doesn’t understand that? “I can’t work for free, I have obligations… Sorry I’m not in a position to push through to help for free.”
    Then be ready to move, that’s the life you live if you are a VFX artist in this day n age. We want it to be better, and it will get better, but right now you have to live as a freelancer all the time. Have a reel up-to-date, always be networking, and don’t own a home, and charge a rate accordingly.
    I hate that its extra harsh for some people but you have to be strong or you get stomped on. Those are the choices here.

    • VFX Soldier says:

      Like I said, I understand the reaction, but the logistics are different.

      For example, some artists who worked through the unpaid months eventually were hired at vfx companies in other countries and banded together to deny jobs for other artists who didn’t play the work for free game. It’s petty, it’s stupid but good artists do get black listed. It’s a jock-like mentality that is a problem.

      • Dave S says:

        that really happens? What kind of dumb shit is that? LOL I was stupid and worked for free hoping not to get f’ed, other people don’t take that risk, end up looking smart, well I’ll show them!!!
        I don’t think that happens. How could it? the people who hire don’t ask everyone if they know this artist. Sounds like a rumor, and how could an artist find out that he/she didn’t get the job b/c these artist talked trash on them? There are tons of reasons for not getting a job. If they really found out conclusively they could sue for slander.

        hows this, if I see someone worked for Lumiere or Meteor to the bitter end I’ll just pick another artist. So even if this rumor isn’t true those guys will pay and be blacklisted!

    • VFXPeon says:

      in this case, i have to agree.

      this place already had a track record of screwing artists and yet they lined up like lambs for the slaughter anyway.

      fool me once, shame on you. fool me twice….

  5. […] for maintenance”, probably of the permanent variety.Read the official filing here.via Lumiere/Meteor VFX Bankrupt Again?! « VFX Soldier. This story written by Randall Hand Randall Hand is a visualization scientist working for a federal […]

  6. manama says:

    “It’s not like there’s another opportunity across town. The only other VFX job for you is probably all the way in New Zealand or the UK.”

    Ummm, Toronto, Vancouver, in like eh, Canada?

    • VFX Soldier says:

      The point is that it’s ridiculous to expect someone to move because companies can’t pay.

    • Ouchi says:

      I’d like to point out that Vancouver is about as far from Montreal as the UK is.

      If you have a family it’s not like “hey, we’ll just move to the other town 2 hours away”

  7. Dave Rand says:

    The fear of blacklisting is real. Just look at the reasons your not posting your real names here on vfx soldier and don’t say it’s cause you want to be cool like Maverick or Goose.

    You say just up and leaving is easy…so is typing your real name…but fear can be a tough animal when you confront it alone.

    Until you’ve worked in an area with few choices, owned a home, had a family don’t criticize those that decide to stay on. Leaving means you risk not being called back when things get better. It means leaving all your work for your friends to finish. It means uprooting everything and taking another chance.

    You become a loner. This is where unions can become very helpful. Not just calling a strike but laying the rules from day 1, and arbitrating those agreements throughout the life of the business, and doing it collectively, with everyone. No more divide and conquer. Not paying your staff becomes way more difficult a choice when your facing a union of employees. Collective contracts are far more powerful that individual ones. That is why you’ll have a hard time finding stories like this one in the unionized world of entertainment, whereas in vfx it’s becoming common place.

    • VFX Soldier says:

      You are correct. In fact I have been unknowingly blacklisted from one company for taking a job at another company. Read Scott Ross’s latest blog post. He was blacklisted for quitting because he was unhappy with the direction an executive was taking lucasfilm. One of the next posts I was planning was about blacklisting. It’s a fact: Good workers DO get blacklisted.

    • Dave S says:

      I don’t think I’m being that coy with Dave S. I think people could guess thats me as I’ve spoken out of thing from time to time. David Schoneveld (agentfx.com). well unless someone else says they’re Dave S. hmm lol I guess then the times I write as Dave S its me. I have posted on here anon on some topics tho. I’m Blacklisted from Luma even tho we’re still friends (the owner and myself). b/c I left w/ less than a days notice for double the pay. So while he got it, I’m blacklisted, not completely out of line there. I shouldn’t have stayed so long burned out (or communicated that better). Anyway it happens.
      I feel comfortable talking about the issues as me. I feel I’m open to changes and I care about company’s health and profit. I feel like if I say something I don’t think people care that much. I’m not an organizer (like soldier), just an artist who will voice an opinion.
      I also feel you should be ok if the company you are talking about hears what you have to say. I don’t think its crazy to tell a company I can’t work for free. “I need you guys to work out the finances so I can continue support my family.” Or tell your friends you’re sorry you can’t fight the good fight or despite the VFX family you’ve made there. Companies have a bottom line and so do I. I’d strong persuade any close friends to do the same, and try to find them work.
      I care about a company and thats why I always try to get involved in efficiencies and pipeline. I want to help them make work faster for cheaper. Sometimes that’s not enough. I know I always do my best, and if the company can’t pay, I can’t stay. Its not negotiable. Thats why I work for other people, I can do FX for free for myself and its much more interesting.

      • Dave Rand says:

        I did not know you were David S… your one of my heros man!
        Your work, plugins, etc are the best! Anyone who blacklists you is a fool.

  8. vfxguy says:

    Here we go again. These pinheads at Lumiere contacted me years ago ask for my services. No freaken chance.
    These where the same idiots who screw artist at Meteor.

    I don’t get the rational period.

    all this crap about blacklist bla, bla.
    what the hell is wrong with these people. Are they still in freaken high school.

    No way no chance its going to change. Why cause one individual will not can not do it alone. Until people get fighting mad … collectively end of story.

    for those who feel working on a cool feature regardless how your treated is great then knock yourself out but don’t come crying after a few years when you have family or a home and that company A just screwed me over.

    hey look on the bright side …. you have a film credit … fantastic. take that to the bank.

    good grief who in there right mind could of even trusted this group of individuals a Lumiere. More like La Merde

    • VFX Soldier says:

      You and I have the experience. Again I get that from everyone posting. However there is always a new crop of artists coming into the industry. Do we just accept this and let it continue? This is the third time. Again I get the shame on you aspect of this, but I don’t think that’s enough. It’s clear that there are artists who are new and not business saavy. They get taken advantage of and lessons are learned.

      However for the industry in general, this is not good that we accept this kind of practice. We have to look out for each other. Even the ones who should know better.

    • Dave S says:

      easy to say, and I agree. This is one reason I want a union or something. I want to protect the young artists who don’t know better and are just eager to work. I personally don;t need a union all that much, but I think things like this… we can just sit by and let people get rolled. It could have been you or me when we were starting.

      • VFX Soldier says:

        I’m not saying you would die without a union… but it wouldn’t prevent you from attaining success in the industry either… and portable benefits, health insurance for the family etc… that would help you even though you are healthy.

      • Dave S says:

        portable health insurance is already available through VES, so again that’s really more applicable to more jr level artist who can’t get into VES yet.

      • Robert Rioux says:

        “portable health insurance is already available through VES”

        Yeah, if you’re american. In Canada we pay full price for the same membership but we don’t get any of the benefits for health insurance. I’m actually having talks with them about the fact that it’s not fair that we pay as much as the others but don’t get the same treatment.

      • Dave S says:

        that’s not included, we can op in for it and pay out of pocket.

      • VFX Soldier says:

        Technically thats the equivalent of purchasing health insurance on your own: it’s quite expensive.

        As a former member of tag, how did the ves plan compare? (I’m begging the question here)

  9. Jeff Heusser says:

    It is situations like this where I see no alternative to a union. It’s the only way a unified voice calls a red flag on nonsense like checks stopping and in unity takes the artists out.

    In the US 1099 workers have no rights of when to expect payment like they would be protected if they were on payroll. I worked at a company that was like clockwork for years and then started stretching out checks for 1099 workers until it got to the point where people started really bitching. I should add we were all also working crazy hours which is also when you can’t deal with this stuff effectively.

    • VFX Soldier says:

      Check out a situation in other parts of the industry:

      An independent filmmaker mentioned that during a studio funded shoot, an investor pulled funding. The director honestly tried to assure that the crew would be paid but SAG immediately shut the production down until checks were cut.

    • skaplan839 says:

      Not to mention the end of 1099s for artists. Or, the practice of abusing the “freelance contractor” title and work status.

      If you’re working at the studios facilities, on their schedule, on their machines, taking direction from their staff .. you’re not a freelance contractor. Period.

      There are ways of setting yourself up as a corporation and being “loaned out”. This puts the tax responsibility on the artists who understand the risk and how to mitigate (and even take advantage) of it.

  10. vfxguy says:

    Most of the studio like “Lumiere” are the fast food joint of the industry.
    Its interest how the the tax break in canada is structured.
    Essentially your own tax money (canadian tax payers) pays 20% of your own salary and yet you still get screwed.

    the tax breaks structure has a very similar line as the welfare system.

    never mind union. Now the law and government need to step in .

    well government won’t do crap unless it has so much press that there force to take notice so they don’t look incompetent.

    I know one thing walking in to Labor board to file a complaint falls on deaf ear in Canada.

    Beside this industry has such a quick turn over that studio have a whole crop of newbie breaking in to the biz which they can fill there heads with all kinds of promise’s.

  11. Dave Rand says:

    This may be a good spot in time for VES 2.0 flex a bit.

    When Meteor pulled the same move on the same spot I wrote VES, 1.0…. it took a few emails to get a response but I did get one. I was told that their charter prevented them from getting involved.

    Now on the heels of their recent visit to Montreal I respectfully invite them to take a roll in getting these fine folks paid.

    • Robert Rioux says:

      I wasn’t involved in the Lumière bankruptcy but I was in Meteor’s. During my career I had the opportunity to work all over the world. Hawaii, Los Angeles, Montréal, London, Vancouver, Shanghai… Sure, traveling was fun. I could see new countries, meet people from everywhere. But now I’m married. One five year old girl and my wife has a 16 year old. I have a house, not and apartment that I can leave easily. I’m in Montréal. The market is dead! There’s not much going on. Why? Mostly because the canadian $ is higher than the US. So why would a Hollywood company want to work with an FX company 5000 km away for a price similar to what they could get in L.A.? The government tax credits are not enough at this point.

      So, I’m in Montreal. Let’s say Lumière has a place for me. I’m out of a job. That’s the only option. Of course I will go there, even if it’s the same people behind Meteor. Everybody needs money. I have bills to pay. I have a family to feed. I can’t move all over the world like before now.

      And as for leaving the job because you don’t get paid, well, the only thing that can happen is that if Lumière gets some money and comes out of financial problems for sure I would lose my job for not showing up in times of crisis.

      The theory of leaving work when you don’t get paid is nice on paper but in reality it’s very hard to exercise because people will do whatever they can to keep their job and pay the bills. Walking out of a job means losing everything for sure. Staying means “maybe things will get better, let’s hope for it”.

      That’s the sad reality of the CG industry in Montreal. The market is too small. And that’s also why I want to get out of the FX industry. It’s too risky here in MTL. I’m not defending Lumière, I’m defending the artists that didn’t have a choice and just couldn’t walk out of the job.

      As for unions, I fail to see how this situation could help the artists. It would help for salary negotiation of advantages but if the company is in financial troubles the union won’t help the company get back on its feet. The unions don’t administrate the companies. Union or not, if the company will go bankrupted if they don’t have any money.

      • Dave S says:

        you make good points. I think your situation is the hardest. This is one of the reasons I’m working currently at a realtime company. I wanted to learn the Unreal engine better. Working on learning how to make games as a career diversifier. http://agentfxudk.blogspot.com/
        I recommend every VFX artist I know to do the same, or at least think about it. Similar skill set, then one can bounce back and forth from games to film whenever the market is right.

      • skaplan839 says:

        Greetings Robert,

        I can’t speak for Canadian labor issues. I’ve attempted to wrap my head around the specific intricacies of Canadian Labor Law, and have yet to reach any significant understanding. I have to blame my arts background. 🙂

        How could a union help? I commented below on the IATSE precedent to establish a contractual stop-gap monetary fund to cover payroll shortages should the issue arise. However, your point is valid. There is nothing a union can do to make a company act responsibly towards their employees.

        Running a business is a risky venture regardless of which field the business operates. Visual effects certainly has its share of challenges. A unionized workforce would be able to have an active and viable avenue for representation with the employer with regards to workplace conditions, standards and minimums.

        Continuing your argument of “the union won’t help get the company back on its feet” .. one can then conclude that you believe the artists should be doing this? Personally, I feel the artists should assume as much risk as they have ownership stake in the company .. none.

      • Dave Rand says:

        I’ve always admired Robert for his talent and insight. I can say this though. Vancouver and Toronto are not experiencing this repeated bullshit and they exists in similar playing fields. I would invite explanations as to why that is, maybe I’m missing something.

        It’s my observation that Montreal has some of the best talent I’ve ever seen and some of the worst management of that talent I’ve ever seen. Those artists deserve a better life and better treatment. A union is not the only answer, it never is, but historically it’s been a damn good start in situations like these. Some change in government standards would help as well….and as I mentioned above, this would be a great chance for VES 2.0 to bust a move. Maybe talk to the labor dept of Montreal on the behalf of these victims? Or at least a statement to the press to follow up with the last bold one, or was that just a membership pitch? I’ve been humming the theme song from Car 54 but replacing the lyrics with..

        “VES 2.0 Were are you?”

        No one came to our aid or took the case seriously until the Meteor situation hit the mainstream press. After the cover story on Playback Magazine and the coverage in fxGuide, Variety and the NY Post, there was nothing but asses and elbows till we saw 70% of our money. We should have gotten all of it and as far as i’m concerned I”m still owed several thousand dollars form the parent companies…I don’t give a shit about what’s legal, it’s about what’s right.

        If the studios want our product and insist on perpetuation of this decrepit bidding business model that they impose on the vfx shops, then maybe they should put up a bond for the single most powerful contributors to there bottom line, the vfx artists….or they might as well take out a full double page add in Variety begging us to unionize. Eventually something is going to have to give here.

        As Steve stated artists don’t sign up to share in the risk or the reward when they are contracted to fixed paycheck. They should be secured creditors and not privileged unsecured creditors. To me privileged translates to lubricated in this context.

      • Robert Rioux says:

        @ Dave Rand I think the problem in Montréal is, well, obviously bad management but also the fact that Quebec is a french province. Toronto’s way bigger than Montreal and there are many more productions being filmed over there. If you do something in english you can sell it in the entire country. IF you make a french production it will be for Quebec only. So if you produce something in Toronto there’s no reason to go to Quebec to do your FX. Much easier to stay in the same city. As for Vancouver they are much closer to L.A. so they can profit from that.

        In Montréal, because we’re only 6 million french people, we can’t afford to have big budget productions because the market is just too small. ALL of the films are losing money in Quebec and the government absorbs the deficit. And that’s a good thing otherwise there wouldn’t be any french productions at all. It’s the price to pay to protect our culture.

        That what’s make the market so different in Montreal. Canadian $ too strong, Montreal too far from L.A. Small market and french language.

        When the canadian $ was at 0.75 cents compare to the US $ Meteor was booming! At one point we had two shifts, one during the day and one during the evening/night. We reached 130 people at one point. Meteor was THE place to work for in Montreal (in 2001-2004). But they did bad decisions too. Between contracts they tried to keep everyone and that costs them way too much money. They should have fired staff way before but they waited too long. Meteor never recovered and every new show was to pay the salaries from the previous one. Then the $ went up and Meteor crashed.

      • tc says:

        There lots of poorly run companies out there. If they can’t get their act together to pay the bills, they shouldn’t be in business in the first place. Everyone is trying to start up a business and everyone is shutting down. If it became a bit more difficult to start a business due to Union agreements we might actually achieve stability with fewer companies and less moving around. We are in an extremely unstable situation, nobody knows where the next big tax incentive will come from. A hotspot in 1 city today will be completely reversed tomorrow by a new gov. announcement. It looks like LA is trying to give more tax incentives too, does that mean we should pack up again and move back to LA?

  12. Jeff Heusser says:

    The way I see a union helping is that paychecks need to be contracted to be on regular intervals and the moment there is a variance in that interval notice served that work will stop if the situation is not rectified immediately – and that threat has to be backed with action. The company may go out of business either way but the artist should not be tricked into working for months for no pay by promises of hope. I see no way for that to happen without leadership, structure and organization behind it.

    I think your post describes two major problems facing our industry… artists with absolutely no power because they insist on being individuals instead of harnessing the power of a group and the fact that businesses based on tax credits or exchange rates are doomed in the long term.

  13. skaplan839 says:

    Precedent has been set with union involvement on payroll matters. When the IA signs an agreement with a production company shooting a film, they stipulate a deposit of at least two weeks of payroll and benefit contributions. Half of this money is returned upon completion of principle photography. The remainder is returned two-weeks after post is completed.

    Since TAG is not party to these contracts and negotiations, I can’t speak at length on this, but its clear the IATSE has experience and an interest in protecting its members when a history of workplace problems such as this arise.

    How does this apply to VFX? Hard to say since a contract doesn’t exist yet, but the need is clear. Obviously, in cases where a studio has a history of default on payroll, language of this nature could be negotiated into a contract to protect the artists at the facility.

    Steve Kaplan
    Organizer
    The Animation Guild, Local 839 IATSE
    skaplan@animationguild.org

    • VFXPeon says:

      Hi Steve,

      Just wondering…what’s up with the relative silence from IATSE these days? You guys had all these meetings and promised a major organizing drive that would begin April and we haven’t heard or seen anything yet. Also, no one seems to be answering emails either. Not sure how much you’ve been keeping up with this blog, but most people around here believe that IATSE has dropped the ball on organzing VFX. There still isn’t even a real website up to support the cause.

      • skaplan839 says:

        Hello VFXPeon,

        The IATSE is still very interested in organizing VFX. Attendance at meetings began to drop and Jim has been attempting to reach artists and facilities through personal outreach.

        If you are interested in speaking with him and seeing more meetings held, I encourage you to shoot him an email at vfx@iatse-intl.com. I know he’d be thrilled to hear from you.

      • jabbaworks says:

        I can attest to Jimmy responding very fast and is very approachable. I have asked the same questions you did and while I did not get a satisfying answer at least I feel in touch and not ignored. thats a good thing.

  14. Dave Rand says:

    I’ve always admired Robert for his talent and insight. I can say this though. Vancouver and Toronto are not experiencing this repeated bullshit and they exist in similar playing fields. Meteor blamed the writers strike, Lumiere wants to blame the dollar. I would invite explanations as to why that is, as maybe I’m missing something.

    It’s my observation that Montreal has some of the best talent I’ve ever seen and some of the worst management of that talent I’ve ever seen. Those artists deserve a better life and better treatment. A union is not the only answer, it never is, but historically it’s been a damn good start in situations like these. Some change in government standards would help as well….and as I mentioned above, this would be a great chance for VES 2.0 to bust a move. Maybe talk to the labor dept of Montreal on the behalf of these victims? Or at least a statement to the press to follow up with the last bold one, or was that just a membership pitch? I’ve been humming the theme song from Car 54 but replacing the lyrics with..

    “VES 2.0 Were are you?”

    No one came to our aid or took the case seriously until the Meteor situation hit the mainstream press. After the cover story on Playback Magazine and the coverage in fxGuide, Variety and the NY Post, there was nothing but asses and elbows till we saw 70% of our money. We should have gotten all of it and as far as i’m concerned I”m still owed several thousand dollars form the parent companies…I don’t give a shit about what’s legal, it’s about what’s right.

    If the studios want our product and insist on perpetuation of this decrepit bidding business model that they impose on the vfx shops, then maybe they should put up a bond for the single most powerful contributors to their bottom line, the vfx artists….or they might as well take out a full double page add in Variety begging us to unionize. Eventually something is going to have to give.

    As Steve stated artists don’t sign up to share in the risk or the reward when they are contracted to a fixed paycheck. They should be secured creditors and not privileged unsecured creditors. To me privileged translates to lubricated in this context.

  15. Davidadammorin says:

    As being a small Vfx Studio from Montreal we feel very bad for our brothers and sisters of Lumiere. We know how hard it is to find good jobs in this industry, in our area.
    I found an old article about the openning of Lumiere on animation world network something Aaron Dem, from lumiere, said caught my attention:

    ” Overall, it’s a new vibe for a new company. In addition to the new pipeline that we’re starting to build, we’re going to be implementing policies to make sure that Lumiere is an enjoyable place to work. Some things that we are already doing are providing home cooked meals several times a week and planning a lounge for the artists to socialize with each other. The idea is to create a culture of creativity and that happens by taking care of the employees and making sure they enjoy coming to work everyday. In turn, that produces the best quality and a successful company!” … I forgot to had you won’t get paid…..

    I hope all vfx artists from Lumiere will get back up fast , we have a lot of talents artists in Montreal…but soon lot of them might have to move to Vancouver, India or even to China to find work.

  16. neonshaun says:

    “The dynamic is much different in LA, yes there are notorious employers who are known not to pay”

    Can we get a list of these notorious employers? I’m interested, as I don’t know of any off the top of my head…

  17. […] instances where Montreal VFX pros were left unpaid. In 2010 there was Fake Studios. Then there was Lumiere. At the same time, Discovery Communications CEO which was sending work to Montreal facilities was […]

  18. Noble says:

    I am regular visitor, how are you everybody?
    This article posted at this site is truly good.

  19. […] Lumiere/Meteor #VFX Bankrupt Again?! […]

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