Rhythm & Hues Taiwan

There’s been a ton of news on the Rhythm & Hues situation and these days I can’t even keep up. One of the surprising stories is about Rhythm & Hues opening in Taiwan while in bankruptcy.

In early 2012, Ang Lee introduced R+H to government officials which led both to announce they would each match a $21 million investment into a film development fund that would help lure US studio work to the region and open a 200-person VFX facility.

R+H filed for bankruptcy in 2013 leaving many without jobs and pay. So, imagine everyones surprise to read an announcement that the Taiwan facility would continue forward unaffected by the bankruptcy.

Twitter and Facebook chatter went viral with posts linking to an announced job fair in Taiwan looking to hire 200 people. This led to wild and dubious speculation that Rhythm was using the bankruptcy to finally rid themselves of the shackles placed on them by evil California VFX artists for the freedom of $250-a-month cheap labor in Taiwan.

However one story that many have missed shortly after Rhythm’s bankruptcy filing was an announcement by the Taiwanese government clarifying that it has yet to give any of the $21 million it promised because R+H has failed to match its end of the bargain.

Furthermore, the government of Taiwan has also announced the end of many film subsidies because of budget woes:

The government is also abolishing exhibition subsidies, which had been instrumental in securing screenings Taiwan films, as well as ending rebates for foreign films that come to Taiwan to shoot. Life of Pi received more than NT$300 million (US$10.1 million) from the local and central government to shoot in Taiwan, and single-handedly wiped out the fund’s budget.

Even with all this grim news, Rhythm’s Taiwan manager is upbeat:

“Everything is working fine on track,” Mike Yang, manager of Rhythm & Hues Studios Taiwan Co., told CNA.

Here’s my analysis of the situation:

In VFX, when a manager says everything is working fine and on track, that usually means it isn’t. Last time something similar was said I was correct in assuming the opposite was true. Did this deal with Taiwan cost Rhythm a substantial amount of money?

It seems to me the bold announcements coming from Rhythm’s Taiwan branch are to send assurances to someone even though Rhythm is in bankruptcy and the government is withdrawing subsidies for the film industry. Someone has to pay for the facility being built in Taiwan. If it isn’t Rhythm or the government then who?

Soldier On.

63 Responses to Rhythm & Hues Taiwan

  1. AnonForNow says:

    I guess we’ll see. My question is… what happens to the vfx workers who were moved to finally stand up when the truth comes out? Will it be broken hearts and disillusionment or yet another surge in support of a union from the Big Lie that’s going on around us?

  2. vfxTaiwan says:

    Hi,
    the number $250US/mo is incorrect.
    The closer number would be $700 ~ 730 US/mo in this field for a kid without any experience even with a few years experience. And the location is at southern of Taiwan. Therefore, I would guess the starting salary for those kids will be even lower.

  3. Paulo says:

    Great all artist will go to produce vfx made in asia! so exciting ! -_- I prefere to be seller in my country… we are not slaves

  4. angryman2012 says:

    Another slave labour camp opens…honestly who in their right mind would be a VFX Artist

  5. Very bad idea to barter your technologies for shares in a Taiwan company. There are enough off-sites for farming out jobs for subsidies. Start taking care of the mother site!

  6. jonavark says:

    Not surprising. Just another drip out of the faucet. It will continue.

  7. Just to be clear the $21M investment fund was to fund co-produced films.

    It was entirely separate from the Taiwan facility deal, and clearly isn’t happening anymore as per the bankruptcy docs listing it as defunct.

    KAO facility funds, while subsidy generated, are different.

    But interesting to note that $20M is the figure sited by R&H as what it would have taken to avoid bankruptcy.

  8. Scholar says:

    Well, all that story about ang lee and R+H crash seems to me that someone put the money into the pocket. It could sounds like one of those conspiracy theory but I still think someone is making money with this.

  9. Andreas Jablonka says:

    well taiwan has not paid r&h anything in cash. sure they subsidies the office there but i think thats fair. a NON refundable credit is ok to draw somebody to a region. if the above numbers are correct its interesting that r&h made only the minimum commitment money wise to be able to open a branch there. Maybe they tried to do it to increase their cashflow rather than cheap labour as india still seems half as expensive to produce.

  10. annonLM says:

    Okay, I have a few questions about all of this. First off are people concerned about people or companies? I am very confused as to which. Another thing that kind of bugs me is that all of these people want to work on U.S. movies. They all seem worry that U.S. companies will leave their countries. There does not seem to be many people that want to share the wealth so to speak. I was a little hopeful at first that many people were waking up and getting it and starting to focus on making real change. Now . . . as always, stagnation. Movement is dying or is already dead. The town-hall as far as I am concerned was almost a complete failure. I think the exception being the union talks. Telling me that the bean counters are, “just doing their jobs” is bullshit. (Sounds to me like someone just worrying about their own money.) Look at the companies that really invest in there employes, like Trader Joe’s or Costco, they thrive they make a profit for everyone and if the greedy idiots would hold value in something more than just money, say quality of life we would all be much better off for it.
    Why are we cutting out other artists that are related to what we do here? Why are we just focusing on vfx? When a lot of our brothers and sisters are being screwed over just the same in other areas. Video games should not be left out at all. Most people on movies could just as easily work on games, so again I ask why are we excluding people? Our issues are not that much different from everyone else.
    We are all artists and I am sick of hearing we only hire the best of the best crap. Granted there is a difference in level of skill, but as any master of their craft will tell you its interest that will keep you going. The more you do the better you get. Also ever notice how the people that are paid well and not over worked somehow get better and better, yet the people that get burned out stagnate? Personally I would hire someone that is interested in the work over someone that just looks good on paper. Companies that are just out for a quick buck are screwing themselves. If you are a company and you are lucky enough to get a great group of people working together, is it better to let all of them go? Or suck it up and hold on to them, knowing that the next job will be that much faster and efficient?
    I know a guy who does fantastic work and whose only problem is that he is terrible at finding work. He also can’t collect unemployment because he as only been hired as freelance. He has been pushed to the limits because he can’t find work. His bills are piling up and literally the only way he can make sure that he will have no more debt is to kill himself. Literally the banks will get rid of his debts if he is dead, they wont give him a loan because he is unemployed, but he can die and that’s OK. What kind of world have we created? I honestly don’t know what to tell him, because he is right.
    The fact that our industry needs a union is evidence enough that the companies we want to work for can not be trusted to look out for our benefits. So why are we so focused on companies? The unionizing talk is great, but it does not seem to help the freelance artists very much. Also, companies are having a hard time releasing work to the people that worked on the shots for their show reels, not to mention the fact that there are a lot of people out there that have not received screen credit for the work that they did. Especially the small companies who pick up a lot of the fall off work because no body can meet the dead lines these movies are expected to make. We are at are best when we work together. And if you do the math there is more than enough money for everybody on this planet. To the greedy few, I hope would learn before it is too late that the world is a much better place to live in when everyone is taken care of. Artists and people in general, (Notice: I used artists so the few simple people can relate. Because it seems to be very hard for people to understand that everyone has the same problem.) work better and produce more when they don’t have to worry about being able to pay bills or about companies taking advantage of them. Proof of that is simple; look at the difference between, the most poverty stricken places in the world to the wealthiest. What do you find?

    • And kumbaya! That’s why artists, including those in the gaming industry need representation in the form of a union. Artists suck as businessman for the most part! My mother, hubby and son are all artists and non have the business acumen of a shark! Wake-up and smell the roses! Hollywood is teeming with sharks and if an artist wants to survive…that’s why stars have agents and the rest of Pre & post production has a union! Companies take advantage of people just
      I,e you!

      • annonLM says:

        Very true. Thank you.

      • BrrrrrapBrapBrap says:

        Well stated. And that’s the honest truth. Talent can only save you on a percent basis. You better bet your competitors are not only your industry colleagues.

        These days your competitors are your clients too. They are trying to stay in business and know they have to callously knife out their vendors to stay afloat. They hope they don’t have to but they don’t have a choice, for their own survival. Many of this thread talks about fairness. How about we get back to what Dave was saying originally. Leverage.

        Because when you’ve had enough, your client will move on to the next hungry shop or artist. All industries are like that.

    • Andreas Jablonka says:

      “The town-hall as far as I am concerned was almost a complete failure. I think the exception being the union talks. Telling me that the bean counters are, “just doing their jobs” is bullshit. (Sounds to me like someone just worrying about their own money.)”

      care to explain why? I thought it was a great success showng solidarity, sharing great knowledge and addressing issued, uniting many different countries to combat the whole “global vfx vs LA” debate. the comment about the bean counters was simple: its a business! dont argue about fair. the world is not fair. they do their best to make money. we dont have to like that. we just have to show them better way to make profit that is also good for us (somewhat paraphrasing dave rand). the are allowed to make money as long as we as artists (and thereby i mean vfx shops included) can make a living and re respected. the comment was to make clear that its nto about expecting fairness or charity, but to be business smart rather than waiting for them to do the right thing.

      ‘Look at the companies that really invest in there employes, like Trader Joe’s or Costco, they thrive they make a profit for everyone and if the greedy idiots would hold value in something more than just money, say quality of life we would all be much better off for it.’
      see above they do it because they found a way to make a profit AND keep workers happy. thats what we need to show them. stopping millions of iterations, adding a post AD to manage revisions and keep the director/client/vfxsupe on track. I personaly think thats the vfx producers job but maybe we need someone dedicated.

      “Why are we cutting out other artists that are related to what we do here? Why are we just focusing on vfx? When a lot of our brothers and sisters are being screwed over just the same in other areas. Video games should not be left out at all. Most people on movies could just as easily work on games, so again I ask why are we excluding people? Our issues are not that much different from everyone else.”
      where did you read or hear exclusion? we are all in the same oat and Scott Ross even said the game industry is next! you are misinformed we care for games, but the gamer need to step up to the task themselves! as much as we cannot expect IATSE or IBEW to do the work for us to unionze they gamers cannot and should not expect the vfx artist to help them instead of THEMSELVES! We invite them to join us, I dont see any exclusion!

      “Also ever notice how the people that are paid well and not over worked somehow get better and better, yet the people that get burned out stagnate? Personally I would hire someone that is interested in the work over someone that just looks good on paper. Companies that are just out for a quick buck are screwing themselves. If you are a company and you are lucky enough to get a great group of people working together, is it better to let all of them go? Or suck it up and hold on to them, knowing that the next job will be that much faster and efficient?”

      Of course an artist that is not burned out works better😉
      Suck it up? Thats what partially killed R&H, hanging on to crew for weeks on end to have the better working crew. It costs MILLIONS to float people and you dont have this kind of cashflow if you are operating on 3% profit margin. R&H had 6% for the most part (according to the bankruptcy docs) in earlier years and still went through thiss hellish process. You cant just suck it up.

      “I know a guy who does fantastic work and whose only problem is that he is terrible at finding work. He also can’t collect unemployment because he as only been hired as freelance. ”
      Thats where a union will help as he was misclassified as freelancer/contractor when he was (most likely) an employee. A union will address labour issue like this. Your friend would be better off as union member.

      “The fact that our industry needs a union is evidence enough that the companies we want to work for can not be trusted to look out for our benefits. So why are we so focused on companies? ”
      because the companies have to make a profit to stay afloat and only if they make a better profit can they pass this on to the artist and “afford” a union. hence Scott Ross attempt to form a trade org to make this increase in profit viable.

      “The unionizing talk is great, but it does not seem to help the freelance artists very much.”
      It does help because a union in a workplace will force the workplace to consider their own survival and join the trade org. You are stopping at 1 dimensional thinking sir!

      “Also, companies are having a hard time releasing work to the people that worked on the shots for their show reels, not to mention the fact that there are a lot of people out there that have not received screen credit for the work that they did. ”
      Again this is up to the studios, who own the copyright, to decide who gets what. Many studios seem to not wanting to give out pates or even final shots, yes they complain about piracy. Screen credit are up to the studios as well and not to the vfx shops. Its shit that they screw us, I agree but you have to blame the right people, not your own shop who has no say in the matter. At Weta we did not get any shots for our reels, yet we had to make breakdowns for a major studio of vfx work done for their film for PR. how is that fair? there it is again..fair? dont get fair..get leverage.

      “Especially the small companies who pick up a lot of the fall off work because no body can meet the dead lines these movies are expected to make. ”
      well they dont HAVE to pickeup the scaps. they chose to and then they have a hard time delivering ut they knew this would happen. I understand its tough but you know what you get yourself into. If the big 6 will get educated about timelines and what is NOT cool to do and change in the 11th hour this should become less of an issue.

      “We are at are best when we work together. ”
      I agree!

      “And if you do the math there is more than enough money for everybody on this planet. To the greedy few, I hope would learn before it is too late that the world is a much better place to live in when everyone is taken care of. Artists and people in general, (Notice: I used artists so the few simple people can relate. Because it seems to be very hard for people to understand that everyone has the same problem.) work better and produce more when they don’t have to worry about being able to pay bills or about companies taking advantage of them. ‘
      I agree but its unfortunately an utopia. greed exists and we cant change that.

      • annonLM says:

        So I am replying to everyone that commented on my previous post. First off I was perhaps a little harsh about the overall meeting, however, I think people need to be very careful of this stagnating or being torn apart by various trolls. And being fair is good business. Henry Ford did that by paying his employees not only a living wage, but more importantly a family wage. This also would have continued to this day if it were not for people cutting corners. So their “just doing their jobs” is still bullshit. They can do better without screwing everyone over, they are certainly paid enough to do better.
        For one the movie studios do have continuous business with millions of customers over years, this equals even more profit for them. Most studios make a profit off of the box office sales, however, as far as the studios are concerned it is about how quick they can make the money back that they invested in the movie. They make profits even off of the movies that tanked, it just takes longer. In fact everyone that is in a union in the entertainment industry, continues to receive residuals off the movies and shows that they work on.
        One of the biggest problems that I see with vfx houses in particular is tunnel vision. They only pay attention to the money on the one movie they work on and once they finished they let most of the people go, while they try to find the next job. I had worked at a shop that was doing stereo work as well as vfx work and I thought at the time how great it would be to have the more entry level people work one the stereo jobs and the senior people work on the vfx stuff and as you expand you can take on more work and get it done quicker and that you should have sales people continuing to find work. The owners were doing that at the time, but ended up passing on jobs because they had too many people focused on one job. This unfortunately lead the company to nothing, this company as well as a few larger ones around the same time went under.
        The work is there and there is plenty of it to go around, the problem is there are too many people cutting corners. (Note: the same attitude of cutting corners is not just isolated to our industry alone.) It seems like they are all trying to take fortune cookie advice from wallstreet. None of them are looking at long term investments only the short term. For instance the big bosses, who give a fuck about movies at all, just want to know how soon they get their money back and if they made a profit as well. They talk to middle management to see where there money is and depending on whether or not the movie was a hit or miss will dictate what excuses they come up with. Piracy is very popular one, which most mid to high level people use. One time in particular they decided that Morgan Freeman’s political views were the cause of a dolphin tales poor box office performance and they also kept the actor in contract from making similar statements before the dark knight movie was released. Utter nonsense but it is exactly what you can expect from people that only give a shit about money and literally nothing else.
        Now the real trick is how to convince these types of people that it is in their best interest to share profits with the people that literally make the products that make the profits. In fact most of the creative types that work on the films are being way under used. There is a gold mine of fantastic ideas out there that just need investors with a vision of the future and not just how much profit they can make right off the bat but sustaining profits that make the whole world a better place to live. The difference between a traditional value market and a modern value market is in how you view the overall profits. Traditional value will make a lot at first but die out quick and leave you with nothing. Modern values cost more at first but are sustaining profits, meaning they don’t die off. The biggest issues in convincing the studios to part with the money is how much of a risk it is. Unfortunately traditional value markets are very predictable so they are easy to manipulate as a whole and looks very good for short term investments. However, modern value markets are not as easy to manipulate, but they will always be sustaining because of the quality involved. John Carpenter’s The Thing is a perfect example of a great movie that was released at the wrong time. It was not very profitable in the beginning at all but went one to make better long term profits. Unfortunately they practically killed the franchise with a mediocre prequel, which had a ton of great elements but bad story and poor execution.
        Star wars is probably the best example of ruining something because the priorities were wrong. George Lucus practically destroyed his whole franchise because he focused on the wrong things. The reason he made “episode one” was because James Cameron knocked him off his pedestal in box office sales with Titanic. He spent the whole time he was making the film bitching about Titanic and cutting corners by not wanting to pay people to work on his film. In fact he treated most artist like crap mainly because he had to pay them to work. Also he focused more on making a film for traditional markets and that of coarse gets you no where. He would have been much better off spending the money on people that could make the film what it should have been. Could you have imagined what “episode one” would have been is you had the writers from the dark horse comics or even James Cameron directing?
        James Cameron wants good work and does not treat his artists bad, he is tough, but at least tries to be fair and it shows.
        One thing that I think would be fantastic is if a large portion of the industry worked creatively off the model that japan did for their anime. The old guys started letting the younger guys run with new ideas and that is in large part why we have so much fantastic stories out of japan. They catered to modern value markets and it has exploded all over the world. Like I said before there is a gold mine of stuff out there for everyone and it just needs investors with vision. I am not against people or companies making a profit at all but they should pay for the work that we create. We should not be wondering around trying to find jobs all the time. We should be able to work at a company that has sales people bring in work, and we work on it. It is better for everyone if we are all paid well and kept reasonably busy. There is plenty to go around for everyone. Do the math and think out side the box.

  11. Scott Squires says:

    Lots of points there.

    “The unionizing talk is great, but it does not seem to help the freelance artists very much.”

    All film crews are freelancers. I don’t understand how all vfx artists think either that they’re permanent staff or freelance and not eligible to have a union. A camera assistant will work on a commercial for a day or two, then have a gap and then work on a feature for 2 months, then fill in on a tv show for a week. How is that not freelancing? The reality is these people are employees and the only distinction is the length of employment. And as R&H proved even staff people can be laid off. That’s always been true so not sure how people think they’re permanent staff. If work is slow then people will be laid off according to money available, staff or not. The only issue is that the film production is unionized so it’s possible to go from project to project and be protected. If that small shop was already union and people needed to work there for a single day, they’d still be covered by the union. The reason it’s hard now is because there shops haven’t been already unionized. The more places unionized the easier it is to get work that qualifies regardless of your length on the project.

    Now if you work as an independent contractor then that’s likely illegal according to federal rules. If a vfx company is doing (surprise) vfx work they can’t have an independent contractor doing vfx. They could have a plumber come in as independent contractor.
    But you can’t have 30 compositors at a vfx company working as independent contractors. Nor can you have 5 of the 30 working as independent contractors. If they’re working at the location being told what to do, etc. then they do not qualify as independent contractors.

    Companies vs individuals – Yes, some people seem to think that success of the companies is the only thing that matters. Now they do go hand in hand and rely on each other. But as an individual you have to take care of yourself. The company is not your friend and is unlikely to view you as their best buddy, especially if money is tight. Now it of course does people no good if the companies go out of business.

    One thing most people don’t consider is how clean of relationship it might be if they were directly employed by the studios. Anything director and producer do are tied directly into costs and time. If there’s a bad vfx supervisor doing things poorly (requiring lots of fix its to make work) then all that would become much more apparent quickly. and artists would have a chance to unionize with the company (studio) that is making the money. Because vfx is an anomaly in the film world and we’ve now removed ourselves form being directly connected with the studios and productions we’ve created many of these problems ourselves. Consider for a moment with no vfx company as the middle man – no more worrying about the company survival and fitness (well at least less worries). No more deep layers of management between real decisions.

    “Another thing that kind of bugs me is that all of these people want to work on U.S. movies. They all seem worry that U.S. companies will leave their countries.”

    Yes you would hope that people would have some national pride and want to see their own media and studios being developed to make their own product in their own country. I’ve seen lots of excuses but if your country or region can afford to spend 100’s of millions on subsidies, you can fund your own films. And in fact they would be investments that could have a return as well as employ local people.

    “The town-hall as far as I am concerned was almost a complete failure.”

    I think it helped galvanize a lot of people. It helped get the word out to all in our industry, including the studios and the media, what the problems were. And got some of the solutions placed on the table. Believe me it’s actually picking up momentum and a lot of work is going on behind the scenes getting more town halls but also exploring solutions.

    As always, people can go on forums all over the internet and complain or they actually so I will help to make a difference. They can volunteer time, effort and solutions to the cause. No one is stopping you or anyone, just lack of actual motivation.

    “Why are we cutting out other artists that are related to what we do here? Why are we just focusing on vfx? When a lot of our brothers and sisters are being screwed over just the same in other areas. Video games should not be left out at all. Most people on movies could just as easily work on games, so again I ask why are we excluding people? Our issues are not that much different from everyone else.”

    First I don’t see people being excluded. I don’t see people here and certainly not vfxsoldier saying we don’t care about games. That was actually mentioned at the town hall. it is tough to cover every interacting form of work. The focus n this particular blog is vfx so that’s not surprising. My suggestion for those in video games is to set up a forum (likely already is) covering their issues. Some issues overlap, some do not.

    “Look at the companies that really invest in there employes, like Trader Joe’s or Costco, they thrive they make a profit for everyone and if the greedy idiots would hold value in something more than just money, say quality of life we would all be much better off for it.”

    Obviously these are exceptions but I would think you consider putting together a business proposal for the studios and companies how they operate like these particular companies and make money. if you want companies and studios to change you have to educate them and you have to offer a real alternative.

  12. CG Joe says:

    Next stop Taiwan!

  13. Isass Derptard says:

    Awesome.. now Taiwan follows China in government subsidized US media company buyouts.

  14. Mclovin Pizza says:

    Next Stop…The Mill. All aboard!!!
    Pizza party to follow.

    https://twitter.com/MillChannel

  15. BrrrrrapBrapBrap says:

    Man there are so few people weighing in to these discussions on a regular basis. No wonder the clients are raping you.

  16. VFX-UK says:

    is it true that Pixo in Santa Monica is shutting down and laid off 200+ artists? here in LND they already shut down…

  17. Reports of extensive layoffs at Sony Culver City today. I have heard that they have been “strongly encouraging” everybody to move to Vancouver…

  18. Tom Roffman says:

    There were some people who had no shows to go onto at Sony that were let go but its not like many of those would have had jobs in Vancouver.

    Currently studios are not greenlighting movies and I am sure it in part has to do with the VFX unrest as they don’t want to be held hostage once shows begin production.

    And there is no truth in Culver shutting down.

    • Scott Squires says:

      If studios have movies all prepped for greenlighting (with actors ,directors, etc) lined up I seriously doubt they would pull those just due to the last month. Until things actually change they have quite a few places to work with. and even then I’m sure they know it will take a while. Of course most tent pole movies aren’t greenlit at this point in the year.

  19. BrrrrrapBrapBrap says:

    Funny how the major vfx shops brag about having an office everywhere under the sun. Prana Studios may have just one the auction according to @benfritz

    brapppbrappbrrappappapapapapppppp

  20. […] Layoffs are nothing new to the industry but VFX Solidarity broke news of a number of layoffs at Sony Pictures Imageworks. What makes this round particularly notable is that this was mostly long-term supervisory and senior talent. According to VFX pro Thad Beier: […]

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    that tends to make any sense. I need to be able to update my website with weblog posts.

    Would you be capable of give a few pros and cons for going with either Blogger or WordPress?
    I actually want to come to a decision fairly promptly on this
    , because it does not make sense for me to own this studio without a
    web page. It would be kind if you can provide me some advice.
    Please write to: eunicecrutchfield@gmail.com
    if you have some spare time. Thx, and by the way great blog, i need my blog to be like yours one day!

  31. Ingrid says:

    Do you mind if I quote a couple of your posts as long as I provide credit and sources back
    to your weblog? My blog site is in the exact same niche as yours and my users would certainly benefit from some of the information you provide here.
    Please let me know if this okay with you. Thanks a lot!

  32. Hey! I hope you are able to answer my question.
    I’m interested in a premium WP theme, however I don’t know how to know if the one I select is going to be compatible with cellular devices.
    What are some recommendations you can give me in regards to what to look for with regards to colors and background and issues like
    that? I typically look at websites via my smart phone, and I’m going to bet that many people are like me in that way. Oops, i went a bit off topic, sorry. Appreciated the post thou.

  33. I run a grilling blog where I share my tasty recipes and secrets that
    I know coming from my numerous years of creating meals.
    I try actually hard to improve my blog more than thrice a week.
    I have had the blog for about 90 days, which I assume is a fairly good amount of
    time. However, my blog doesn’t get very many visitors . When I look for my posts on Aol, it is certainly challenging for me to discover them. I found this site on the very first page of DuckDuckGo when i searched for Rhythm & Hues Taiwan | VFX Soldier, therefore i think you must be a specialist, care to share some advice with me?

  34. Howdy would you mind letting me know which webhost you’re working with? I’ve loaded your blog in 3 different
    browsers and I must say this blog loads a lot faster
    then most. Can you recommend a good hosting provider at a
    fair price? Thanks a lot, I appreciate it!

  35. I wished more publications would be as enlightening as this one.
    Do me a favour, don’t ever change your composing syle, I adore it! Thank you

  36. Dottie says:

    Try 3single dot com. There you talk to amateur women who look like your neighbor. Have fun🙂

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