The Desolation of NZ: Government Bails Out US Producers Again

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Image by Jesse Toves

An unprecedented display of corporate power over a sovereign nation.

In 2010, WB & Peter Jackson demanded that the NZ government offer more generous subsidies and a change in national labor laws or else the Hobbit would be made elsewhere. Prime Minister John Key eventually agreed and at the time I wrote a warning that the US studios would look to take advantage of them again.

Then in 2011, the US studios showed up again. This time they tried to take advantage of emergency legislation needed to help Christchurch earthquake victims by attaching bills that would grant them the power without due process to disconnect internet access of anyone they suspect of piracy.

Imagine my surprise when this past December James Cameron and Avatar producers demanded another increase in the amount of subsidies they would receive to make the Avatar sequels in New Zealand.

NZ media was overwhelmingly against this decision

You know things are really bad when local Op/Eds in NZ describe the Avatar bail out with words and phrases like “sell out”, “blackmail”, “road to hell”, “race to the bottom”, “rent seeking”, and “big fat spoilt child”.

When is a subsidy not a subsidy? When it’s yours
Latest sell out to Hollywood further delays self reliance
Is the NZ Film Industry a Big Fat Spoilt Child?
Film deal a race to the bottom
Race to the bottom
Avatar’s arrow has found its mark
http://www.interest.co.nz
NZ Radio

Subsidized locations will need permanent government assistance

The long term prospects for subsidized locations is not good when you consider that US studios are not only expecting permanent government assistance, but are also expecting the amount they receive to be increased every few years.

Weta Digital is arguably the best VFX company in the business but the evidence has shown that US studios only base their decision off the subsidy. They will make talent constantly move wherever the next government exists willing to hand out free money while workers shoulder the costs of displacement.

It has only been about the subsidy

In 2010 Peter Jackson submitted a report to the government pointing out that NZ has nothing to offer other than a subsidy for film production or else the studios would go to Canada. In 2010 when Avatar producer Jon Landau was asked why he chose NZ, he singled out the subsidy. In this latest fiasco, Landau again points out that it is all about the subsidy which he pushed to get increased:

It is neither the archipelago’s volcanoes nor its glaciers that are attractive, because the “Avatar” movies will be shot indoors. Sure, Peter Jackson’s award-winning special effects infrastructure is there, but the deciding factor was the money. “We looked at other places,” says Landau. But in the end, “it was this rebate.”

The latest increase in subsidies is still not enough

What’s amazing about all of this? NZ’s latest increase is still not good enough. When you have to compete with countries like Australia and Canada which are willing to offer subsidies of 40-60% you can expect the studios to keep asking for more.

According to reports, Australia was looking to lure the production to their country and while NZ was able to increase the subsidies for them, James Cameron has stated already:

He said he would have liked to see even higher rebates but could live with the 25 per cent on offer, and believed other major productions would agree.

NZ Treasury ignored twice and costs are increasing

This latest fiasco has finally delivered something we rarely see: An independent measurement of the costs of these subsidies by the NZ government. The NZ Treasury shows that the current subsidies are losing $NZ 168M. Their report strongly condemned giving more money to US studios but the Prime Minister ignored. You can read the damning report here. Supporters of subsidies cannot depend on government assistance forever and the argument that they should keep increasing them when current figures show a loss should be a major concern.

While New Zealand has won awards and has spent over a billion luring US studios there, the stakes to continue being a player in their game is increasing and professionals working in the VFX industry are just along for the ride as the ability to settle in a location, have a family, and avoid costly bouts of displacement are a constant threat.

Soldier On.

47 Responses to The Desolation of NZ: Government Bails Out US Producers Again

  1. Jackadullboy says:

    That memorandum is a fascinating read.

    All this time I thought the dog was definitely wagging the tail. Instead, we see an uncompromising New Zealand Government really laying down the law and letting the Studios know who’s boss. (Erm…!)

  2. John says:

    I suggest everyone read more about the TPP (Courtesy of nakedcapitalism.com)

    The Trans-Pacific Partnership n. 1. A “free trade” agreement that would set rules on non-trade matters such as food safety, internet freedom, medicine costs, financial regulation, and the environment. 2. A binding international governance system that would require the United States, Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Vietnam, and any other country that signs on to conform their domestic policies to its rules.

    • Studio_Spotter says:

      In what capacity? I just read what I could find from a few google searches but found nothing related to subsidies and that it is still under negotiations. And how would this differ from the WTO? Some of those countries are WTO members as well. Would the WTO agreements trump the TPP? Or visa versa?

      • vfxmafia says:

        NAFTA..targeted domestic unions, labor laws, and basically international labor law…..it degregulated the work place on an international level…..and was single stupediest thing Clinton has ever done.

        .but Trans Pacific Partnership is going specificially for intelectual rights……specifically the internet….and limiting implications for Internet services, civil liberties, publishing rights and medicine accessibility. NAFTA wanted your job…and Trans Pacific Partnership wants your TV, Internet, and medicine cabinet.

        The intellectual property means GMO’s for everyone…..pay for every streaming movies in every country…and US pharmaceutical prices for everyone. Disney and Big Pharma are just some of the ones carving up the pie. And John Kerry is marching around the world trying to sell it to everyone.

        If anyone wants to bitch about subsidies….you should see who is getting what in this agreement. In a large part it has been done all under the table without the public’s knowledge. Wiki leaks actually is the main reporter on what is actually taking place.

        TPP will effect you soon for sure…..

        http://www.democracynow.org/2013/11/14/tpp_exposed_wikileaks_publishes_secret_trade

  3. misha says:

    I was surprised to find Neill Blomkamp state, in the “Elysium” special features, he looks for 3 things to make a film: one of which is the best subsidies….

  4. Chris Simmons says:

    Every film maker looks for who has the best subsidies. It’s part of financing now, they call it “Soft money” and without countervailing duties, it is the new normal.

    • Hollywood Reporter says:

      It will continue to move out of California even with countervailing duties. Producers will just move to countries with lower labor costs and lower costs of living. Can’t impose a CVD on that Bro.

      • Andreas jablonka says:

        Bs argument, cheaper labour exists in china and India for decades yet all the world has not moved there. “Bro”

      • Hollywood Reporter says:

        Well Imageworks has been in India for years and others have had less reasons to migrate there because of incentives closer to home, often in the same time zone.

        But they will move there if forced to because of CVD’s IMO.

      • vfxguy says:

        @andreas why do you think all the work hasn’t moved there? Hint: they begins with ‘s’ and vfxsoldier hates them

      • Andreas jablonka says:

        @vfxguy I did not make that stupid statement. And I agree with you😉

      • Hollywood Reporter says:

        @ andreas, sure you did make that stupid statement… “Bs argument, cheaper labour exists in china and India for decades yet all the world has not moved there.”

        That was your reply to my comment that more work would go the far east and not back to California if subsidies were wiped out because of cvds.

        Not “BS”.

      • Andreas jablonka says:

        Well
        It hasn’t happened. All work could have done there. It did not Nd will not. You know the redo rates and still low quality. It’s a scarecrow that’s alll

      • LAskyline says:

        @Andreas jablonka – do you believe that removing subsidies will bring back all the work to California?

      • minoton says:

        Let’s look back at a bit of vfx history.

        When George made Star Wars, the vfx were done in L.A. because that’s where, at the time, the largest collection of vfx talent was. The group was only called the visual effects unit. It wasn’t until SW took off and sequels were proposed that ILM become an entity, and George made offers to go up to Marin Co. During the 80s and early -mid 90s they were the undisputed leaders of the industry. Why? Because they had a large concentration of TALENT. Sure, there was talent still back down in L.A.: Boss Films, Dream Quest, Apogee, EEG, et. al. But ILM was the undisputed king of the mountain. This was without subsidies to lure film work there. It was solely based on TALENT and QUALITY OF WORK. Peter Jackson has tried to do a similar thing with Weta, and was very successful with it while he was working on the original LOTR movies.

        Fast forward to now. Subsidies. If subsidies were neutralized or went away, I would expect to see a large contraction in the areas that are subsidized. Many immigrant artists (not all) would likely head back to their homes, rather than staying in a cold rainy city. Then they would choose whether to stay, or move to where a stable company, or vfx center, was operating, just like ILMers did in the 80s.

        If VFX facility owners want to stay owners, and vfx producers want to stay producers, then they would start doing what they had to, to retain TALENT, and recruit the best talent that they can in order to lure the work to their facility. Governments need to stop meddling in what it costs to make a movie, and doing what they can to help local businesses stay open, and also help lure talent to their shores. Subsidize the talent, not the studios. The best situation for all artists is for the subsidies to go away (or at least become financially meaningless).

      • Andreas Jablonka says:

        No i do not. I believe that london and Vancouver will lose about 50% of their work and it will be redistributed. some of this will flow back to LA. due to convenience and proximity to the studios that produce is. LA has lost over 65% of its talent tool to the other centers so even if all the work would come back, it could not be handled anywhere. R&H is a ghost town, DD is severely smaller than it just to be without facilities to expand to a crew of 600 or bigger. Sony is the only place that could fill their empty building again as its mostly producing in vancouver right now. The TV and commercials houses are fairly as is so they cannot take on much more work.

        Vancouver has build up a huge workforce and industry presence so even without subsidies it would keep lots of work as its able to hanlde large shot counts but thats not the same as thinking it worked and it has builds its own industry. It did create jobs that were filled with immigrant workers and thats hardly good for their economy.

      • Long Time Post & VFX Producer says:

        Hey Andreas, what makes the US’s decision to let you in better or different than British Columbia’s decision to let educated immigrants into their provence to help create an industry that is “50% survivable” (your words) if they do away with subsidies?

        Seems like a good investment to me.

        The end result is the investment creates an industry with a solid, relatively well paid workforce, and when the Canadian dollar falls to pre 2007 rates to the US dollar (which it will), then they get a lot of the other 50% back!

        Your view that educated immigrants are bad for an economy is just one of the reasons VFX is failing in the US. If the US allowed these young kids to come to the US it might have made it difficult for other countries to create a workforce so you reap what you sow as they say.

        Here’s a good one by Doug Stanhope (which your banter reminds me of…):
        http://digg.com/video/acerbic-comedian-doug-stanhope-drops-some-truth-about-immigration-hysteria

      • Andreas Jablonka says:

        like i said in the other post:
        “immigrant workers dont buy houses, they funnel their money back HOME, it does NOT go into the local economy more than at home. they do pay taxes but often less as many companies let be tax exempt to pay them in your home country (weta for instance) so you dont get the benefits.”

        Overall If I pay taxex in BC to improve my industry I want canadians to take these jobs not imported workers. Your industry should be staffed with YOUR workers right? this is not about protectionism or anything. If I pay taxes for my are aI want my area to improve. Not helps new people come into the area to leave the unemployed worked unemployed. BC grew huge and did not have enough skilled workers. So of course they need to import them. I think thats a sign that its been artificially grown rather than organically expanding with supply and demand. If they SLOWly upped the inventiced to grow their own workforce over 5 years that be different. But all these vancouver filmschool kids wont get jobs as the needed pros. not juniors. it feels unfair to the taxpayers.

      • minoton says:

        Which reinforces the case that the ‘incentives’ are being poorly spent, not benefiting Vancouverites whose tax dollars fund them. It seems the people benefiting most of the Canadians’ tax dollars are the American studios and the American (and other) imported workers. I won’t use the word immigrants, because most are just up there temporarily, working on the project, sending as much money back home to their families as they can, and will then leave once the job is done. If anything, they should be referred to as temporary immigrants, but in reality, they are migrant workers.

      • LAskyline says:

        The people I know in government love highly-paid immigrants: they pay their taxes, spend a disproportionate amount of their income in the territory (compared to permanent residents) and then leave when their job is done rather than hang around sucking up national resources as they age into decrepitude. But of course the government types don’t make a noise about this for fear of upsetting the xenophobes.

      • Andreas Jablonka says:

        Well I dont have a study to back this up but my experience has been: immigrant workers dont buy houses, they funnel their money back HOME, it does NOT go into the local economy more than at home. they do pay taxes but often less as many companies let be tax exempt to pay them in your home country (weta for instance) so you dont get the benefits.

        I agree on the old age part. But thats because they dont sink any roots done. Some workers stay in these locations and then they do. but overall If I pay taxex in BC to improve my industry I want canadians to take these jobs not imported workers.

      • LAskyline says:

        My experience, working around the world, is that I saved about as much as I usually do here – sometimes a bit more, sometimes less – but I spent plenty of money groceries, clothes, eating, air fares,cars etc and I paid taxes in the local territories at the upper rate. I never bought houses, but I spent plenty – proportionally more in the long term – on rent. I don’t know of any situation where my employer was able to avoid paying taxes on my work or pay me in the US and I don’t know anyone in VFX who was “funnelling it back” to some home village or group of impoverished relatives.

      • meinvan says:

        ahahaha, as one of the biggest commenters, denying that subsidies can actually build industries says this:

        “Vancouver has build up a huge workforce and industry presence so even without subsidies it would keep lots of work as its able to hanlde large shot counts”

        yes you go to saying “but thats not the same as thinking it worked and it has builds its own industry. It did create jobs that were filled with immigrant workers and thats hardly good for their economy.”

        but that really: a) comes across like your trying to justify your own statemnet, b) you know nothing about economics….and c) your just a douche….as an immigrant you therefore couldnt possibly doing any good for americas economy. so if your not doing any good, you must be part of the problem.

        andreas, I think you have just managed to make a complete and utter fool of yourself.

        (side note: you go on to bitching about the students in another post of yours, from the sounds implying that they are unhire-able and not needed….didnt you say in another post that your now teaching….therefore by default and according to your own words, you are part of the problems with this industry, your words, not mine)

      • Andreas Jablonka says:

        “Vancouver has build up a huge workforce and industry presence so even without subsidies it would keep lots of work as its able to hanlde large shot counts”

        yes you go to saying “but thats not the same as thinking it worked and it has builds its own industry. It did create jobs that were filled with immigrant workers and thats hardly good for their economy.”

        but that really: a) comes across like your trying to justify your own statemnet, ”

        its always fun arguing with anonymous internet trolls but here we go:

        vancouver got lots of work from subsidies. thats a fact. hence it has build up a workforce to be able to produce these shots. part canadian, part immigrant workers. many who are NOT residents. thereby NOT eligible for subside rebates. so the companys are forced to fill their ranks with non canadians to accommodate the heightened workload. this is building an own industry. this is renting one. BC should have used its own taxpayers money to encourage local growth of its own filmaking industry. rather than throwing money at the us studios who in turn force bc to bring in more non canadian workers. its not building the canadian industry.

        “b) you know nothing about economics….”
        I dont claim to know much about it. But I can call shit when I see it.

        “and c) your just a douche….as an immigrant you therefore couldnt possibly doing any good for americas economy. so if your not doing any good, you must be part of the problem.”
        If I was just a temp worker I would not do it much good no. I would take a local job from somebody. Since Im a permanent resident I grow roots like buying a house and thereby investing into the local economy.

        IN BC I think 1 out of 3 migrant workers end up as residents or so. These do too. Just not most. and thats till does not solve the canadian unemployed workers.

        “andreas, I think you have just managed to make a complete and utter fool of yourself.”
        If you think so. I hope I can sleep at night being haunted by anonymous nightmares😉

        “(side note: you go on to bitching about the students in another post of yours, from the sounds implying that they are unhire-able and not needed….didnt you say in another post that your now teaching…therefore by default and according to your own words, you are part of the problems with this industry, your words, not mine)”
        Students are a vital part of a growing industry. But BC is exploding. If it took year to grow these students could have been mentored into junior artist. right now many house dont want to hire them as they need more seasoned pros. so I feel bad for them.
        I am teaching and you are correct that makes me part of an economy thats not being very truthful about job futures. I am however very honest about their future potential with them and that they will probably have to serve a year in vancouver or london or montreal if they cannot find a spot in the Game industry which luckily many want to get into.
        See it like this, if BC would not subsidies the shizniit ouf of vfx work we would all still work on features in LA and I would not teach. Maybe I should bill vancouver/london/insertSubsidieLocvationhere for loss of income?

      • Long Time Post & VFX Producer says:

        Of course if they disagree with you they are anonymous trolls. VFX Soldier posted anonymously for years and while I think he has misplaced energy on how to solve a very real problem I’d never call him a troll.

        I do wish, however, there was a way for posters to articulately comment on your nutty opinions and why you are flat out wrong about immigration without stooping to calling you a douche bag.

        It kind of distracts the message.

      • Nick says:

        @ Andreas. You quote Weta as an example for a lot of things so I thought I propose a scenario about permanent residents doing such great “good” when they buy a house. When you get a highly skilled labour force injected into a small town such as Wellington over the course of 10-15 years it really messes with property prices. Not only does the purchase of anything liveable in Wellington by artists drive up the price of property, it leaves the locals in the dust scraping by as their cost of living sky rockets and they lose any chance of owning a home etc. This happens everywhere when people with money come into a city and buy up all the property. Home prices rise, rent rises cost of living rises. I don’t think owning a home makes you immune to criticism. Did you own a home in Wellington while you were there?

        I’m not sure what you’re talking about with being tax exempt. I give quite a lot of money to the New Zealand government, I pay rent to a local couple, I bought a car here, pay insurance here, pay into a free accidental coverage account, buy my food here, buy my entertainment here, go on summer road trips here and visit all the tourist attractions. I easily spend over %50 of my wages here and the money I do save I keep in an NZ bank account because the interest is great. I guess because I don’t own a house I’m not contributing to New Zealand’s economy?

      • Andreas Jablonka says:

        Nick,

        “When you get a highly skilled labour force injected into a small town such as Wellington over the course of 10-15 years it really messes with property prices. Not only does the purchase of anything liveable in Wellington by artists drive up the price of property, it leaves the locals in the dust scraping by as their cost of living sky rockets and they lose any chance of owning a home etc. This happens everywhere when people with money come into a city and buy up all the property. Home prices rise, rent rises cost of living rises. ”
        I totally agree. Vancouver had a big influx of rich chinese investors and hence their housing market is totally bonkers.

        “Did you own a home in Wellington while you were there?”
        I did not. I rented a place in town that was furnished. I knew I would not sink down roots.

        “I’m not sure what you’re talking about with being tax exempt.”
        Weta gives you the choice of opting to be tax exempt from income tax if you are spending less than 6 month (186 days I believe) in NZ.

        “I give quite a lot of money to the New Zealand government, I pay rent to a local couple, I bought a car here, pay insurance here, pay into a free accidental coverage account, buy my food here, buy my entertainment here, go on summer road trips here and visit all the tourist attractions.”
        I did the same thing although I only had 1 trip of one week to spend before I left.

        “I easily spend over %50 of my wages here and the money I do save I keep in an NZ bank account because the interest is great. I guess because I don’t own a house I’m not contributing to New Zealand’s economy?”
        Its not black and white. of course you are contributing to it but studies have shown that for all the money you spent in the amount of tax collected is LESS than what the government spents to lure these jobs to NZ in the first place. So maybe we should say that while the middle(earth)men profit from the increased economy the government does not. That aside if 50% is accurate that is a lot. I did not spent nearly as much maybe 25-30% as weta was in crunch time, they catered food a lot, i sold my car etc. The house comment had more to do with roots. if you stay in an area you might own property you might invest in local businesses. you might coach a football team. things your don’t do when you are only temporary.

        Weta has build an infrastructure and has many, if not the highest amount of temp workers becoming residents of all locations. Its a great place to live for sure! but what is our argument? its that subsidies displace workforce. if you chose to sink down roots thats great. now imaine if 1 year later the shop moves country and you have to decide to move again or change careers. thats how LA feels right now and thats how many NZ Film industry folks (not so much weta per se) felt. the incentives elsewhere were bigger and the tv shows fired up. lots of stage workers and other post folk out of a job.

        it happened in vancouver as well. maybe it will happen to Montreal next. subsidies makes the whole vfx world play musical chairs. and thats not cool.

  5. Hollywood Reporter says:

    I have researched Singapore (where ILM and DNeg are located) and according to these sources below they have no subsidy for doing VFX shots in the country that go directly to the Film Studio or Foreign Producer:

    http://www.entertainmentpartners.com/production_incentives_results/?jid=133

    http://www.kpmg.com/Global/en/IssuesAndInsights/ArticlesPublications/film-financing/Documents/countries/singapore.pdf

    “Project Criteria”
    “Singapore must be showcased in a positive light in the script, and the production must provide an estimated budget of local spend, track record of the director, producer, and actors, and the financing, marketing, and distribution plan on the initial application to be considered.”

    It appears the advantages for companies to set up shop here are based upon other benefits for having a business in the country and other considerations such as local prevailing labor rates, not a direct subsidy back to a producer as is the case in Canada and other areas with incentives.

    If Singapore’s policies on taxation are not favoring any specific industry to create an unfair competition it seems to me all the arguments for a CVD on Singapore created shots goes out the window. So if you chase companies out of Canada, do they come back to California or relocate to Singapore where ILM has created proof of concept it can work. I say the latter.

    Just sayin.

    • minoton says:

      Lucasfilm’s former CEO (?) Mich Chau comes from a family with strong ties in Singapore banking. The Singapore location was chosen while she was still running the company. That is why ILM/Lucasfilm Animation have a location in Singapore. As for D-Neg, maybe they just thought it was going to be the next big thing and rushed to follow Lucasfilm’s lead. As we have seen with R&H’s heavy investment in India and other Asian countries, lower labor rates alone are not conducive to a company’s bottom line.

    • Manakin says:

      The Singapore Government through it’s Economic Development Board invested around US$60M in LucasFilm Animation Singapore, it has the majority shareholding but they are non-voting preference shares. Even though Disney now owns LucasFilm it appears they are still invested.

      In addition LucasFilm gets innovation grants from the EDB of around $5M per year but also had an investment target of around $150M by the end of 2013 which they missed.

      LucasFilm was also granted Pioneer Status which typically gives seven years of tax relief on profits which, like many media companies attracted to Singapore, they have not been able to take advantage of. There are other capital investment incentives which are available to any Singapore based company.

      The new SandCrawler facility is owned by a subsidiary and leased back, there were possibly incentives involved there but no body looses money investing in property in Singapore.

      DNeg’s involvement with Singapore started as an apprenticeship / scholarship scheme where the EDB funded Singaporeans to work in London for several years. DNeg set up an office here when many of these people returned but also hired a lot of international talent.. They likely qualified for Pioneer status and other innovation grants.

      • Hollywood Reporter says:

        That’s great info that is hard to find on the web. At least it was for me. An investment implies a direct expected return whereas a subsidy doesn’t. Innovation grants are more R&D than subsidy, they create work opportunities via the technological advances, they don’t subsidize the actual work, someone would argue.

        So the only real subsidy for Lucasfilm Singapore appears to be tax relief on “profits” for seven years from shots created in Singapore, which are hard to figure into the sale of shots to US Producers for purposes of slapping them with a CVD. And you mention they have not been able to take advantage of them yet anyways.

      • Manakin says:

        Singapore government grants and incentives are usually a co-payment with specific targets – investment, local spend, training & employment.

        There was a period when the Media Development Authority invested directly in content creation for film and TV and took an ownership stake but it was badly managed and they came in for criticism when it came to light they had never collected their earnings. Many of the higher profile film international projects were disappointing, both creatively and financially. Now they focus more on grants for local TV & film production, gaming, media and publishing.

        A lot of the financial information is public domain, check out the SG government bizfile site, if you’re so inclined and have a credit card.

  6. james says:

    Even though I work at Weta, I have to say I’m also pretty disappointed about NZ selling itself out like that. Its humiliating and downright embaressing they bent over so quickly. I really wished they didn’t cave like that, so we could see for ourselves if we could secure the projects based on our own merits.
    The sad reality is as evidenced by those words from the producers themselves though, the subsidy was the deciding factor.
    Like in Vancouver, I also worry bout the ticking clock here in NZ, for once Peter Jackson retires, which it sounds like after hobbit3, his purse that has been keeping weta above water is going to shut, he’ll probably sell weta like lucas did with ilm and then I predict things won’t be so rosy round here for long after avatar, and will be pretty hard going for weta and all of us in it to stay upright. I hope i’m wrong and PJ just decides to give us a huge bonus instead… but I doubt it unfortunately

    • Jackadullboy says:

      I would actually say that New Zealand is a somewhat unique case in the following sense.

      For a country that (for all it’s incredible natural beauty) is as remote and expensive to reach for most people on the planet, the positive impact of the film industry on the country’s tourism must be inestimable. Hard to put a price on, I would say…

      That being the case, it’s not surprising that the government has thus far been so ready to bend over backwards for the studios.

      There has to be a breaking point though, and one has to question the long-term wisdom of hanging a nation’s pride on as fickle and elusive an entity as “Hollywood”. As soon as pride turns into embarrassment the game is up.

  7. Steve says:

    I looked at the file you posted but couldn’t find any mention of the $NZ 168M loss or any part that “strongly condemned giving more money to US studios”

    Which paragraphs are you referring to? I’m not saying you’re wrong I literally can’t see those facts in the pdf you linked to.

    • VFX Soldier says:

      page 14: The current regime is also estimated to have had an overall negative fiscal impact of NZ$168 million once tax revenue that would have been earned anyway is taken into account

  8. Idiot says:

    Did u factor the current financial windfall in air fairs alone the NZ government recouped in air NZ flights because of increased traffic directly related to the film business ?

    • VFX Soldier says:

      Idiot,

      If you listen to the radio nz link they actually talk about tourism: They found that tourism has actually been the same level it was before they started making movies so there isn’t really a macro increase like the film industry argues.

      >

    • minoton says:

      NZ better come up with some Pandora locations to tour to justify getting bent over by Cameron/Landau/20th Century Fox.

  9. Idiot says:

    http://www.tourismnewzealand.com/markets-and-stats/

    More stats showing all but china with increases

  10. Long Time Post & VFX Producer says:

    Of course if they disagree with you they are anonymous trolls. VFX Soldier posted anonymously for years and while I think he has misplaced energy on how to solve a very real problem I’d never call him a troll.

    I do wish, however, there was a way for posters to articulately comment on your nutty opinions and why you are flat out wrong about immigration without stooping to calling you a douche bag.

    It kind of distracts the message.

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